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Posts Tagged ‘Ice Pans’

1. Winter Light

 

I called this post winter light because the light has been so unusal over the past week or two. Or maybe it’s just that I’m noticing it more. It is easy and gentle on the eyes and I pay particular attention to it in the afternoon, hoping for any signs of a lengthening day.

 2. Winter Light

This was taken late one afternoon after a snow storm. “Late” afternoon actually means about 4:30 right now.

3. Sunlight on Snowy Trees

This was the view out my back door after a recent snowstorm that quit at about mid day and let the sun come out. With such weak sunshine and no wind the snow stayed on the tress for quite a while.

 4. Ashuelot Sunset 

The Ashuelot River hasn’t frozen over yet but border ice is forming along its banks, growing slowly in towards its middle. I call these ice shelves, and if you aren’t familiar with the lay of the land on the shoreline, they can be dangerous once covered by snow. Twice last year I found myself standing on ice shelves when I thought that I was standing on dry land. Thankfully, they held my weight each time, but I’m being much more careful this year. Walking on frozen rivers is a dangerous game.

 5. River Ice Patterns 

In the shade, patterns could be seen in the ice. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website tells me that this ice is called columnar ice because of its column shaped grain. This ice is very clear and usually grows in areas with slower flow. Once the river has been covered bank to bank with ice the crystals continue to grow downward, thickening the ice cover.

 6. River Rapids 

On a slightly warmer day I tried to get shots of some interesting waves on the Ashuelot. There’s a rhythm to a river just like with most things in nature, and if you tune in to that rhythm you can get shots of cresting waves every time you click the shutter. If you watch a certain spot and only that spot you find that the river does almost the same thing over and over again, just a few seconds apart.

7. Monadnock from Perkins Pond

I could see from quite a distance that Mount Monadnock had snow on it but I wanted a closer look so I drove to Perkin’s Pond in Troy, which is a favorite viewing place. The pond was completely frozen over and the only sunshine to be had was up on the mountain. The wind often howls down the length of this pond in winter, making this a very cold spot. Still, I’m sure that it was much colder on the summit.

8. Monadnock from Perkins Pond

Snow makes the mountain even more beautiful. It could be ankle deep or shoulder deep. It’s hard to tell from here, and I’m not going to climb it to find out.

 9. Winter Light

In summer I’m usually worn out from traipsing through the woods long before the sun sets, but in the winter the days wear out before I do. When you’re out there with a camera on a cold winter day and everything is going well and you feel that you might be getting some good shots, it’s hard to watch the sun set so early.

10. Sunset on the Waterfall

The setting sun turned the Ashuelot River falls into a golden ribbon one afternoon. I was surprised that they hadn’t frozen.

11. Sunset on the River

The river was also colored gold and had frazil ice pans forming in it. Frazil ice forms in super cooled water and then floats to the surface where it clumps together to make various ice formations .They were a sure sign that the water was frigid, no matter how hard the sun tried to hide it.

Nature is so powerful, so strong. Capturing its essence is not easy – your work becomes a dance with light and the weather. It takes you to a place within yourself. Annie Leibovitz

Thanks for stopping in.

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