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Posts Tagged ‘Hosta Seed Pods’

It’s been cold here and any ice that forms at night no longer melts during the day, so I’ve been seeing quite a lot of it along with other, more welcome things.

 1. Icy Puddle

That white, strange sounding ice is forming on puddles and pond edges again and it always reminds me of spring. Trapped oxygen accounts for the color, but I’ve never been able to find out why it makes such a strange hollow, tinkling sound when you ride your bike through it.

 2. Ice Needles

When ground water meets below freezing air it becomes super cooled and freezes, and when hydrostatic pressure keeps forcing the super cooled water out of the soil “extrusions” form. The water slowly moves through hollow needles, freezing and lengthening each needle as it goes. These needles then usually freeze into bundles like that shown in the photo. I found this needle ice at the base of a small hill.

 3. Icy Stream Bank

Time will sometimes let us see how foolish we have been, and as I look at this photo now and think back to how slippery the ice covered rocks on this stream bank were, I realize that standing on them was a foolish thing to do. The water was about 4 feet deep and looked mighty cold, but I wasn’t thinking about any of that when I saw the sun shining on these ice formations.

4. Barberry Fruit

Barberry berries shine like tiny Christmas bulbs in the sun. Unfortunately they hang from the very invasive Japanese barberry ((Berberis thunbergii). One way to identify Japanese barberry in the winter is by its single, unbranched (and very sharp) spines that form in the leaf nodes along its stems.

5. Unknown

This has me completely stumped. It’s one of the strangest things I’ve seen in the woods and I think that it’s a lichen but if it is, I’ve never seen one like it. I’ve never seen a picture or a description of anything like it either. And I’ve never felt one like it-it felt like a fungus. It was large-about the size of an average doughnut. I’ve got to go back to it and see what, if anything it has done.

Note: Thanks to Rick over at the Between Blinks Blog, this has been idetified as the crust fungus Phlebia radiata. There will be more on this in a future post.

6. Common Fern Moss aka Thuidium delicatulum 2

In the late fall and winter fern moss (Thuidium delecatulum) turns yellow-green. This moss is sometimes called log moss because it is often seen on them, but it also grows on the bases of trees and on soil.

7. Foamflower Leaves

The leaves of foam flower (Tiarella cordifolia) slowly turn purple as it gets colder, starting with their veins. We’ve had some real cold weather so I was surprised to see them still so green. Hundreds of these plants grow on a wet embankment near a stream. Their drifts of small white, bottlebrush-like flower heads are beautiful in the spring.

8. Hosta Seed Pods

Since it gets dark so early these days I’ve been using the flash a bit more. I like how detailed it makes some things look. These are the open seed pods of a hosta.

9. Grape Tendril

Here in New Hampshire the two most common wild grapes are the fox grape (Vitis labrusca) and the river grape (Vitis riparia). Both look a lot like concord grapes.

 10. Eastern Arborvitae aka Thuja occidentalis Cones

The dried, open cones of northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) look like tiny, carved wooden flowers. Gone are the eight seeds that each one holds, but the flattened, scale-like leaves so common on cedars can be seen in this photo. Native Americans showed 16th century French explorer Jacques Cartier how to cure scurvy with the leaves of this tree and he was so impressed that he named it Arborvitae, which is Latin for Tree of Life. He also had trees with him when he returned to Europe, so Thuja occidentalis became the first North American tree to be introduced there.

Ice burns, and it is hard for the warm-skinned to distinguish one sensation, fire, from the other, frost. ~ A.S. Byatt

Thanks for stopping in.

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