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Posts Tagged ‘foliage colors’

1. Branch River Colors

We seem to be very close to our peak foliage colors here in this part of New Hampshire so I thought I’d show you a few more of my favorite places to see them. The above photo is of the Branch River in Marlborough. What look like bright yellow shrubs along its banks are actually thickets of oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus,), which is a very invasive vine.

 2. Bittersweet Berries

One way oriental bittersweet spreads is by people cutting it to make wreaths for the holidays and then when the holidays are over, tossing the wreath in their compost or taking it to the local landfill. These vines are strong enough to strangle trees to death, just as if a wire was wrapped around them.

 3. Dirt Road

I’ve driven down so many back roads lately that I don’t even remember where this one was, but it doesn’t really matter because at this time of year they all look like this.

4. Ferns

I took a few photos of this spot last summer and really liked the ferns, so I thought I’d go back and see what it looked like. I still like the ferns.

5. Fern Turning

Some ferns fade slowly until they become completely white. Others turn yellow and then brown.

6. Pond View

The morning I went to this pond was very cloudy but then the clouds parted for just a minute or two and lit up these trees. The clouds closed in again and I took photos of cranberries, which is what I went there for in the first place.

7. Forest Path

I love just wandering through the woods at this time of year with no real destination in mind. As the Beatles said; oh that magic feeling, nowhere to go.

8. Maple Leaf Viburnum

Something I find growing along the path in the previous photo is maple leaf viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium,) which is one of the most beautiful shrubs in the forest, in my opinion.  It changes color from green to orange, pink, purple, red, or a combination of several colors before changing to a pale, almost white, pastel pink before finally falling.

9. Monadnock

One of my favorite views of Mount Monadnock was showing less color than I expected.

10. Monadnock from Perkins Pond

Another favorite view from Perkins Pond was showing virtually no foliage colors. I think the bare trees are birches. They turn first and the howling winds that blow through here strip the leaves from them quickly, so I miss them every year here.

11. Blazing Birches

This is what I was hoping the birches in the previous photo were going to look like.

12. Hillside Colors

It’s not easy to judge the quality of light and what it will do to fall foliage colors in photos. Not only light’s intensity but the direction it is coming from makes a big difference. As I stood at this place looking at the hills clouds were racing by so I was able to shoot the same scene in both full sun and deep shade. In this instance the colors in the photos looked dull and drab in the shade and harsh in full sun. I think that a slight overcast would have helped.

13. North Ashuelot

The upper Ashuelot River in Keene was ablaze with color one afternoon. Being in this leaf tunnel with the sun shining brightly outside of it was amazing.

14. South Ashuelot

The lower  Ashuelot in Swanzey is colorful as well, but the colors have come more slowly here.

15. Fallen Leaves

As if the beauty of the colors wasn’t enough, we also have all of the scents that take us back to childhood; overripe grapes, apple cider, witch hazel and wood smoke. But especially the leaves; nobody who grew up in New England could ever forget the earthy smell of the ankle deep leaves after scuffling through them on their way to school every day.

Why is it that so many of us persist in thinking that autumn is a sad season? Nature has merely fallen asleep, and her dreams must be beautiful if we are to judge by her countenance. ~Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Thanks for stopping in.

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