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Posts Tagged ‘Common Wood Nymph’

1. Milkweed Tussock  Moth Caterpillar

This milkweed tussock moth caterpillar (Euchaetes egle) and several of his friends were busy eating a milkweed plant one day on the river bank. They, like the more familiar monarch butterfly caterpillars, advertise the toxicity they get from the milkweeds with black, white and yellow colors and birds leave them alone. They were feeding on top of the leaves, right out in the open.

 2. Grass with Purple Seed Head

One day I saw this grass growing by a pond. I’ve never seen another grass with a dark purple seed head like this and I haven’t been able to identify it.

3. Lady Bug

I wonder if the aphid just above the head of this ladybug knew that he was on the menu.

4. Milkweed Aphids

I was wishing the ladybug was in my pocket when I saw all of these aphids on a swamp milkweed pod. I’m hoping I can collect some seeds from them this year but that won’t happen if aphids suck all the life out of the plants.

 5. Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly aka Cupido comyntas

This little butterfly led me down an interesting path recently. I saw a flash of blue wings and followed it around until it let me take some photos. Then when it came time to identify it I convinced myself that it was a Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis,) which is endangered and protected under federal law, and which you can go to jail for chasing.  After I caught my breath I took a closer look and noticed the little “tails” coming from the hind wings. They are one of the things that separate the Eastern tailed blue butterfly (Cupido comyntas) from the Karner blue so I was safe, but that was close!

6. Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly aka Cupido comyntas By D. Gordon E. Robertson

I couldn’t get a shot of the eastern tailed blue butterfly with its wings open but I did find this excellent photo by D. Gordon E. Robertson on Wikipedia so you could see the same beautiful wing color that I saw. Just in case anyone reading this might be wondering, I’ve sworn off chasing blue butterflies.

7. Possible Common Wood Nymph aka Cercyonis pegala

I didn’t have to chase this brown butterfly. It just sat there and let me take as many photos as I wanted when its wings were closed, but every time I tried to get a shot with the wings open it closed them. I still wonder if it was reading my mind. At first I thought it was a common wood nymph (Cercyonis pegala) but now I’m not so sure. It had large spots on its upper wings.

8. Possible Small Heath Butterfly aka Coenonympha pamphilus

At one point I thought this was a meadow brown butterfly (Maniola jurtina), but then I decided it was a small heath butterfly (Coenonympha pamphilu.) Now I’m not sure if it’s either one, and you’re finding out why I do plants and not butterflies.

NOTE: Josh Fecteau from the Josh’s Jounal blog has identified this one as a Common Ringlet (Coenonympha tullia). Thanks Josh!

 9. Virgin's Bower Seed Heads

Virgin’s bower vines (Clematis virginiana) are slowly going to seed.

10. Rose Hips

The hips of the Alberta wild rose (Rosa acicularis) are the only ones I know that have prickles. I’ve never seen them on rugosa rose hips. I’m not sure what the white liquid that looks like latex could be.

11. Cauliflower Mushroom

This is the only cauliflower mushroom (Sparassis spathulata) that I’ve seen but I don’t know how I’ve missed them all of these years, because they’re big. This one was the size of a soccer ball. It has a strange growth habit that looks to me like a big ball of cooked egg noodles and in fact, people who eat them use them in place of egg noodles in dishes like beef stroganoff. They are said to grow on the roots of hardwoods but this one was under an eastern hemlock.

12. Tiny Yellow Mushrooms

These butter wax cap (Hygrocybe ceracea) mushrooms growing on a twig were very small and I wasn’t sure if I could even get a photo of them.  The biggest might have been a little over a quarter inch tall with a cap half the diameter of a pea. The smaller ones looked like yellow dots.

 13. Mystery Fungus

Here’s one for all of you mystery lovers out there. These string-like fungi (?) were on the vertical face of a rotting log but they didn’t look like they were growing out of it. They looked more like they had been placed there. It was hard to tell how long they were but it must have been at least 3-4 inches and their diameter was just about the same as a piece of cooked spaghetti. I’ve never seen anything like them.

 14. Mystery Fungus Closeup

Here’s a closer look at the mystery whatever they are. They appeared to be very fragile because two or three of them were broken into pieces. Were they even alive? I’ve looked through all of my mushroom books and spent considerable time on line trying to identify them but haven’t had any luck. If you know what they are or if you’ve ever seen anything like them I’d like to hear from you.

15. Chicken of the Woods aka Laetiporus sulphureus

This one was not a mystery. I’ve seen chicken of the woods before (Laetiporus sulphureus,) but never one as colorful as these. All of those I’ve seen in the past were plain sulfur yellow without the orange, and that’s why another common name for them is sulfur shelf. I’ve read that as they age they lose the orange color, so these examples must have been very young. The name chicken of the woods comes from the way they taste like chicken when cooked. Finding bright colors in the woods at any time of year is always a surprise and I always feel grateful that I was able to see them. I sat on the log beside these mushrooms for a while, admiring them. They were beautiful things, bigger than my hand.

Nature, even in the act of satisfying anticipation, often provides a surprise. ~Alfred North Whitehead

Thanks for coming by.

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